employee relations strategy

Long-range planning of the “employee experience” can seem daunting, sometimes to the point of disregard, or perhaps to the point of being seen as unnecessary.

That is understandable. After all, just what does an employee relations strategy even mean? What does it involve? Is it simply a review of every touchpoint in the employment relationship? Is it taking an inventory of pay, benefits, and work rules and saying “We have a plan?”

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Consider this: You can positively influence business metrics with sound ER plans: measures such as retention and turnover costs; litigation avoidance; creativity and new idea generation; sales; and brand reputation.

How are these types of stats impacted by an ER strategy? By placing the representatives of your business on an equal footing with other long-range thinking, such as marketing or finance.

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A 360° ER strategy might include employee feedback mechanisms, executive access opportunities, internal complaint resolution, mentoring programs, career pathing, succession planning, or cross training. These are the tools you can put into play over and above the basics of pay and benefits.

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Chances are you are doing positive things for and with employees already. However, you might not see them as a cohesive or strategic program.

This is where HR Resolves comes in. We review your current programs, discuss your views, budgets, and desires. We identify gaps, if any, along with timeline and cost considerations. And we look carefully at value. Some programs undertaken by other employers yield nothing useful, and are exercises in futility. We assist you in avoiding those as well.

With your input we organize and prioritize a strategic approach to the employee side of your business - a plan that you can easily implement and, most importantly, maintain.

Surprisingly, you might find that you can complement your present employees relations programs for little additional cost.

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Contact us at any time. There are no obligations, of course, until you say "go."